Jazz

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Premade Jazz Album Cover Art Designs

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Download exclusive premade Jazz music album cover designs and digital artworks for sale created by artists, for artists.

Can’t discover your artwork? We’ve got you covered! Buy cover artwork's job is to curate a collection of unique exclusive licenses download premade artworks for sale, also provide design services for artists, musicians, bands, singers, vocalists, DJs, producers, record labels, authors, content creators, distributors, and publishers with the collaboration of top artists, designers, and makers that would elevate music into visual imagery.

Covering every genre, from Classic jazz and Modern jazz to Post-jazz. Grab your favorite Artworks (illustrations, images, photos, collages, and graphic arts) and use them for Albums, Singles, EPs, Posters, Merchandise and more on Distrokid, Spotify, Apple Music, Bandcamp, Soundcloud, Tidal, Deezer, and other Streaming, Publishing, and Printing Services. You also can turn them into a short looping animation and use it for streaming services like Spotify videos or YouTube and other social media like Instagram stories or TikTok.

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A Dive Into Jazz Music

Jazz is music performed by an ensemble of players, each (very) specialized and proficient in their respective instrument. The usual Jazz instruments are: trumpets, saxophones, clarinets, trombones, string-bass, and piano alongside drums and a jazz-guitar. The interaction between these players is crucial. Compared to Rock or Blues, Jazz musicians follow no completely predetermined scores. They have to “feel” what the others are about to play and how the music will evolve. Yes, there are chords and melodies forming an identifiable foundation for each song, but improvisation and instantaneous experimentation are never absent. In a way, true Jazz music can only be experienced live. Each performance is supposed to be different. Jazz therefore is part of a thriving nightlife subculture in (Jazz) bars all over the world. The difficult aspect of improvisation probably explains why Jazz of all the super-genres is the most (if not always) instrumental, experiments the least with sound effects and plays more with structure, patterns and rhythms, reminding us a lot of Classical Music.

Jazz provides an interesting combination of (lower class) African American folk music with (upper class) European amusement and classical music. As such, Jazz has never been as racially defined as Blues is and is undoubtedly laudable for bonding these subcultures. Jazz ensembles are divided in different sections: the rhythm section (bass, drums, and piano) provide a steady beat throughout the track, while the melody section (horns) plays the chorus altogether and afterwards separately with solo’s.

The precise origin of the word Jazz has been lost over the course of time. Three possible explanations exist, though none of them might actually be the truth. One suggests that the word is black slang for the ensemble. Another hypotheses tells us that its roots lie in an early Jazz band named “Razz” or an early musician named “Jazbo”. Or the name might also be slang for “Jasmine”, the most common perfume for prostitutes working in early twentieth century brothels (where Ragtime and Jazz developed).

The power of Jazz lies in its rich contrast: improvised versus predetermination, chaos versus control and light and gentle sounds versus sharp and shrill tones. Jazz is also unique in influencing many genres in a subtle manner. Although there are no immediate derivative genres coming from Jazz, countless ones have been influenced by it. Its unique concepts and instrumentation are versatile enough to transfer to the most diametrical of popular music genres.

Over the course of history, there have been attempts to divide Jazz into a small number of categories, which could have been super-genres in their own right. Names such as “Traditional or Post-Jazz”, “First, Second and Third Stream (Jazz)” have been viable options at one time or another, but hold barely any relevance in today’s styles of Jazz. One possible way to structure this whole is by using two pivotal moments - the birth of Bebop and Fusion - to divide the whole into three time periods: Classic Jazz, Modern Jazz and Post-Jazz (aka Post-Fusion or Free-Bop).

In the mid-seventies Jazz gets strongly repressed and overshadowed by R&B. Many American Jazz musicians migrate to Europe, where funded Jazz festivals and Jazz bars in historical city centres thrive better than in the States (particularly in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe). Currently, American Jazz education is on the rise, but general public interest has stayed off. Post-Jazz has therefore become a global and heavily dispersed phenomenon of a genre that once was the sound of a nation.